Posts tagged technology
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ginseng-and-honey:

In September 2012, hundreds of amateur and professional photographers had the rare opportunity to explore and photograph accelerators and detectors at particle physics laboratories around the world. 

The top 39 photographs from the Photowalk, including the six winners of the jury and “people’s choice” competitions, are now viewable online.

“The worldwide opening of the physics laboratories for the Photowalk has been an excellent opportunity for showing the real places of physics research,” says Antonio Zoccoli, a member of the executive board at the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics. “The Photowalk tells us that scientific research is a global enterprise, which brings together intelligence, resources and technologies from different countries toward a common goal.

Photowalk winners show modern beauty of science
Photos viewable here [x]

(via scinerds)

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Self-assembling particles to boost speed of computer chips.
Scientists have created new kinds of particles, 1/100th the diameter of a human hair, that spontaneously assemble themselves into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.
Particles engineered to spontaneously self-assemble like atoms forming molecules could give rise to new high-tech materials, leading to better optical displays and faster computer chips, researchers say.
The scientists say they could manipulate these bonds to create colloids of a specific color, size, chemical function or electrical conductivity. This, in turn, could lead to the production of new materials, such as photonic crystals to improve optical displays and boost the speed of computer chips.

Self-assembling particles to boost speed of computer chips.

Scientists have created new kinds of particles, 1/100th the diameter of a human hair, that spontaneously assemble themselves into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.

Particles engineered to spontaneously self-assemble like atoms forming molecules could give rise to new high-tech materials, leading to better optical displays and faster computer chips, researchers say.

The scientists say they could manipulate these bonds to create colloids of a specific color, size, chemical function or electrical conductivity. This, in turn, could lead to the production of new materials, such as photonic crystals to improve optical displays and boost the speed of computer chips.

(via contemplatingmadness)

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Space Shuttle Flight Decks photos by Ben Cooper

I’ve played enough video games during my tenure to safely assume that I could easily jump behind the joystick of one of these beauties and immediately be sailing at a smooth near-lightspeed. It’s gotta be that easy, right? My secret to success: mash every button until it does something you want. Ben Cooper took these absolutely gorgeous fisheye shots of the space shuttle flight deck interiors, with prints available at launchphotography, to post up on your wall and gaze longingly at.

(Source: ianbrooks, via songsofstarlight)

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News Update Sept. 19, 2012 

Media telecon for the Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity rover mission. Associated images are also available at: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon

(telecon begins at about 9:12 in the video)

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James Webb Space Telescope mirror ‘cans’
The powerful primary mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect the light from distant galaxies. The manufacturer of those mirrors, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo., recently celebrated their successful efforts as mirror segments were packed up in special shipping canisters (cans) for shipping to NASA.
The Webb telescope has 21 mirrors, with 18 primary mirror segments working together as one large 6.5-meter primary mirror. The mirror segments are made of beryllium, which was selected for its stiffness, light weight and stability at cryogenic temperatures. Bare beryllium is not very reflective of near-infrared light, so each mirror is coated with about 0.12 ounces of gold.
Image Credit: Ball Aerospace

James Webb Space Telescope mirror ‘cans’

The powerful primary mirrors of the James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect the light from distant galaxies. The manufacturer of those mirrors, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo., recently celebrated their successful efforts as mirror segments were packed up in special shipping canisters (cans) for shipping to NASA.

The Webb telescope has 21 mirrors, with 18 primary mirror segments working together as one large 6.5-meter primary mirror. The mirror segments are made of beryllium, which was selected for its stiffness, light weight and stability at cryogenic temperatures. Bare beryllium is not very reflective of near-infrared light, so each mirror is coated with about 0.12 ounces of gold.

Image Credit: Ball Aerospace

(via distant-traveller)

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Fermilab’s 570-megapixel Dark Energy camera captures first images

(via scinerds)

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The Large Hadron Collider

It’s super-massive and recently discovered something analogous to the Higgs-Boson, without which… nothing would *matter*. But in these detailed shots, even the $4 billion science-making uber-magnet can vogue it up a little for the cameras. Oh yes, LHC, yes, the cam-er-a loves you. Yeah baby

One final shot I had to include, because this configuration of buttons actually exists:

(Source: ianbrooks, via songsofstarlight)

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