Posts tagged saturn
kenobi-wan-obi:

Candle in the Dark


  Saturn’s rings cut across an eerie scene that is ruled by Titan’s luminous crescent and globe-encircling haze, broken by the small moon Enceladus, whose icy jets are dimly visible at its south pole.
  
  The scattered light around planet-sized Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) makes the moon’s solid surface visible in silhouette. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across) enjoys far clearer skies than its giant sibling moon.
  
  This view shows the unlit side of Saturn’s rings.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Candle in the Dark

Saturn’s rings cut across an eerie scene that is ruled by Titan’s luminous crescent and globe-encircling haze, broken by the small moon Enceladus, whose icy jets are dimly visible at its south pole.

The scattered light around planet-sized Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) makes the moon’s solid surface visible in silhouette. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across) enjoys far clearer skies than its giant sibling moon.

This view shows the unlit side of Saturn’s rings.

(via scinerds)

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A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon
This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.
Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans
These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon

This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.

Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans

These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via project-argus)

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I look up — many people feel small because they’re small and the Universe is big — but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity.

That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant, you want to feel like a participant in the goings on of activities and events around you.

That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive…


- Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson [ x ]

(Source: kavaeric, via songsofstarlight)

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Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

(Source: distant-traveller)

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Lord of the Rings, Saturn

(via expose-the-light)

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Angling Saturn
The Cassini spacecraft takes an angled view toward Saturn, showing the southern reaches of the planet with the rings on a dramatic diagonal. North on Saturn is up and rotated 16 degrees to the left. This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 14 degrees below the ringplane. The rings cast wide shadows on the planet’s southern hemisphere. The moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) appears as a small, bright speck in the lower left of the image.
Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Angling Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft takes an angled view toward Saturn, showing the southern reaches of the planet with the rings on a dramatic diagonal. North on Saturn is up and rotated 16 degrees to the left. This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 14 degrees below the ringplane. The rings cast wide shadows on the planet’s southern hemisphere. The moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) appears as a small, bright speck in the lower left of the image.

Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

(via distant-traveller)

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Titan’s atmosphere.

Titan’s atmosphere.

(Source: infinity-imagined, via nefohnetla)

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expose-the-light:

Saturn

1. Saturn Mosaic

Photograph courtesy NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A total of 126 images taken over the course of two hours make up this mosaic picture of Saturn. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft snapped the photos on October 6, 2004, when it was approximately 3.9 million miles (6.3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Cassini was on a four-year mission to explore the ringed planet.

2. Titan Halo

Photograph courtesy NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A halo surrounds Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. Titan’s atmosphere, almost entirely nitrogen, extends some 370 miles (600 kilometers) into space—ten times as far as Earth’s atmosphere.

3. Saturn and Moons

Photograph courtesy NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Two of Saturn’s 48 known moons are barely visible in this picture of the ringed planet. Mimas, at the upper right, has an enormous impact crater on one side, and Tethys, at the bottom, has a huge rift zone called Ithaca Chasma that runs nearly three-quarters of the way around the moon.

4. Saturn’s Rings

Photograph courtesy NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Saturn’s otherworldly rings encircle the planet and extend out for hundreds of thousands of kilometers. The rings—there are thousands—are made up of billions of ice and rock particles, thought to be pieces of comets, asteroids, or shattered moons.

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