Posts tagged planetary

Science and Space Posters by Ron Guyatt

Part of a series for spacevidcast.com to help inspire and spread the Good Word of Science! Prints available at etsy.

Artist: Tumblr / Website / Facebook

via ianbrooks

(via project-argus)

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A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon
This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.
Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans
These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon

This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.

Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans

These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via project-argus)

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Potential Future Landing Site in Holden Crater

Potential Future Landing Site in Holden Crater

(Source: beautifulmars, via darylelockhart)

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WHAT IF other planetary bodies orbited our world at the same distance as the moon?

(via distant-traveller)

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Marks on Martian dunes may be tracks of dry-ice sleds
NASA research indicates hunks of frozen carbon dioxide — dry ice — may glide down some Martian sand dunes on cushions of gas similar to miniature hovercraft, plowing furrows as they go.
Researchers deduced this process could explain one enigmatic class of gullies seen on Martian sand dunes by examining images from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and performing experiments on sand dunes in Utah and California.
The hillside grooves on Mars, called linear gullies, show relatively constant width — up to a few yards, or meters, across — with raised banks or levees along the sides. Unlike gullies caused by water flows on Earth and possibly on Mars, they do not have aprons of debris at the downhill end of the gully. Instead, many have pits at the downhill end.
The location of the linear gullies is on dunes that spend the Martian winter covered by carbon-dioxide frost. By comparing before-and-after images from different seasons, researchers determined that the grooves are formed during early spring
Scientists theorize the bright objects are pieces of dry ice that have broken away from points higher on the slope. According to the new hypothesis, the pits could result from the blocks of dry ice completely sublimating away into carbon-dioxide gas after they have stopped traveling.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona 

Marks on Martian dunes may be tracks of dry-ice sleds

NASA research indicates hunks of frozen carbon dioxide — dry ice — may glide down some Martian sand dunes on cushions of gas similar to miniature hovercraft, plowing furrows as they go.

Researchers deduced this process could explain one enigmatic class of gullies seen on Martian sand dunes by examining images from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and performing experiments on sand dunes in Utah and California.

The hillside grooves on Mars, called linear gullies, show relatively constant width — up to a few yards, or meters, across — with raised banks or levees along the sides. Unlike gullies caused by water flows on Earth and possibly on Mars, they do not have aprons of debris at the downhill end of the gully. Instead, many have pits at the downhill end.

The location of the linear gullies is on dunes that spend the Martian winter covered by carbon-dioxide frost. By comparing before-and-after images from different seasons, researchers determined that the grooves are formed during early spring

Scientists theorize the bright objects are pieces of dry ice that have broken away from points higher on the slope. According to the new hypothesis, the pits could result from the blocks of dry ice completely sublimating away into carbon-dioxide gas after they have stopped traveling.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona 

(Source: distant-traveller)

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I look up — many people feel small because they’re small and the Universe is big — but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity.

That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant, you want to feel like a participant in the goings on of activities and events around you.

That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive…


- Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson [ x ]

(Source: kavaeric, via songsofstarlight)

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Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

(Source: distant-traveller)

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Lord of the Rings, Saturn

(via expose-the-light)

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expose-the-light:

Earth from Space

(via scinerds)

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