Posts tagged photography

leslieseuffert:

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"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Pablo Picasso

(via dawnawakened)

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odditiesoflife:

10 Wild Facts About Chameleons

  • 1 — Changes in light, temperature or emotion can prompt Chameleons to change color - they do not change color to camouflage themselves.
  • 2 — Their tongues moves faster than human eyes can follow, hitting their prey in about 30 thousandths of a second. They have ballistic tongues that are 1.5 - 2 times the length of their body.
  • 3 — The word ‘chameleon’ is a combination of two Greek words, “Chamai”, meaning ‘on the ground’ and “Leon” meaning ‘lion’.
  • 4 — Chameleons do not have any ears.
  • 5 — Almost half of the world’s species live on the island of Madagascar with 59 different species there. There are approximately 160 species of chameleon worldwide.
  • 6 — Chameleon eyes have a 360-degree arc of vision and can see two directions at once. They can rotate and focus separately to observe two different objects simultaneously, which lets their eyes move independently of each other.
  • 7 — Their feet resemble tongs with five toes that are fused into one group of two and another group of three.
  • 8 — A prehensile tail is adapted for grasping especially by wrapping around an object.
  • 9 — Males are typically much more ornamented. Many have head or facial ornamentation such as horn-like projections while others have large crests on top of their heads.
  • 10 — Chameleons vary greatly in size and structure. Their lengths can vary from 15 millimeters (0.6 in) in the male Brookesia micra (one of the world’s smallest reptiles) to 68.5 centimeters (30 in) in the male Furcifer oustaleti.

 sources 1, 2, 3

(via shychemist)

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expose-the-light:

Glowing Universe Overhead

(Source: shainblumphoto.com, via scinerds)

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The Road of Rest by Shingo Takei

Northern stars shine above Japanese Alps (the northern range). The photographer has made this image in a moonlit night from Mount Norikura in Gifu Prefecture, Central Japan.

The Road of Rest by Shingo Takei

Northern stars shine above Japanese Alps (the northern range). The photographer has made this image in a moonlit night from Mount Norikura in Gifu Prefecture, Central Japan.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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This is what happens when bullets hit things.

Photographer Deborah Bay doesn’t want to detail her own gun control views: “I think it’s up to the viewer to interpret the work,” she says. But the photographer does ask us to “realize the impact any of these bullets would have on muscle and bone,” and to appreciate how pervasive guns have become in America.

(Source: fastcompany)

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Re-entry of satellite Hayabusa.

Re-entry of satellite Hayabusa.

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Between A and B by Camil Tulcan

(Source: cosascool)

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Milky Way Shows 84 Million Stars in 9 Billion Pixels

Side Note: The two images shown above are mere crop outs from ESA’s recent hit: The 9 Billion Pixel Image of 84 Million Stars. These two focus on the bright center of the image for the purpose of highlighting what a peak at 84,000,000 stars looks like.

Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory in Chile have released a breathtaking new photograph showing the central area of our Milky Way galaxy. The photograph shows a whopping 84 million stars in an image measuring 108500×81500, which contains nearly 9 billion pixels.

It’s actually a composite of thousands of individual photographs shot with the observatory’s VISTA survey telescope, the same camera that captured the amazing 55-hour exposure. Three different infrared filters were used to capture the different details present in the final image.

The VISTA’s camera is sensitive to infrared light, which allows its vision to pierce through much of the space dust that blocks the view of ordinary optical telescope/camera systems.

source

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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arpeggia:

Fan Ho - Hong Kong Yesterday

(via darylelockhart)

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