Posts tagged lab

Why do light sticks glow? CHEMILUMINESCENCE

Light sticks glow because of chemiluminescence (the light produced by a chemical reaction), where light is made by the reaction of some chemicals: hydrogen peroxide, phenyl oxalate ester, and flourescent dye.

Hydrogen peroxide is placed inside a thin glass that is inside the light stick’s container. It is surrounded by the solution of phenyl oxalate ester and flourescent dye. To operate a light stick, you bend it. This breaks the glass with hydrogen peroxide, making it blend with the solution outside. The chemical reaction of the three chemicals makes the light stick glow. This is the reason why hydrogen peroxide is called the “activator” it’s the one that makes the chemical reaction happen.

(Photos by: CC)

(Source: holymoleculesbatman, via shychemist)

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laboratoryequipment:

Metamaterial Flows Like Liquid, Returns to ShapeA bit reminiscent of the Terminator T-1000, a new material created by Cornell researchers is so soft that it can flow like a liquid and then, strangely, return to its original shape.Rather than liquid metal, it is a hydrogel, a mesh of organic molecules with many small empty spaces that can absorb water like a sponge. It qualifies as a “metamaterial” with properties not found in nature and may be the first organic metamaterial with mechanical meta-properties.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/metamaterial-flows-liquid-returns-shape

laboratoryequipment:

Metamaterial Flows Like Liquid, Returns to Shape

A bit reminiscent of the Terminator T-1000, a new material created by Cornell researchers is so soft that it can flow like a liquid and then, strangely, return to its original shape.

Rather than liquid metal, it is a hydrogel, a mesh of organic molecules with many small empty spaces that can absorb water like a sponge. It qualifies as a “metamaterial” with properties not found in nature and may be the first organic metamaterial with mechanical meta-properties.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/metamaterial-flows-liquid-returns-shape

(via shychemist)

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Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory study nuclear explosions by using 3-D simulations. They follow a long tradition of nuclear research that led to the creation of the atomic and hydrogen bombs.
(via Nuclear Explosion Simulation Picture – Science Photo - National Geographic Photo of the Day)

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory study nuclear explosions by using 3-D simulations. They follow a long tradition of nuclear research that led to the creation of the atomic and hydrogen bombs.

(via Nuclear Explosion Simulation Picture – Science Photo - National Geographic Photo of the Day)

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