Posts tagged elements
holymoleculesbatman:

This molecule is called Cortisone.
It is one of the main hormones released by the adrenal gland in response to stress. It is used to treat a variety of ailments and can be administered intravenously, orally, intraarticularly, or transcutaneously. Cortisone suppresses the immune system, thus reducing inflammation and attendant pain and swelling at the site of the injury. Risks exist, in particular in the long-term use of Cortisone.

holymoleculesbatman:

This molecule is called Cortisone.

It is one of the main hormones released by the adrenal gland in response to stress. It is used to treat a variety of ailments and can be administered intravenously, orally, intraarticularly, or transcutaneously. Cortisone suppresses the immune system, thus reducing inflammation and attendant pain and swelling at the site of the injury. Risks exist, in particular in the long-term use of Cortisone.

(via shychemist)

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Susitna Glacier, Alaska by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
NASA image acquired August 27, 2009Content below by NASA Goddard Photo and Video’s Flickr 
“Like rivers of liquid water, glaciers flow downhill, with tributaries joining to form larger rivers. But where water rushes, ice crawls. As a result, glaciers gather dust and dirt, and bear long-lasting evidence of past movements.”
“Alaska’s Susitna Glacier revealed some of its long, grinding journey when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite passed overhead on August 27, 2009. This satellite image combines infrared, red, and green wavelengths to form a false-color image. Vegetation is red and the glacier’s surface is marbled with dirt-free blue ice and dirt-coated brown ice. Infusions of relatively clean ice push in from tributaries in the north. The glacier surface appears especially complex near the center of the image, where a tributary has pushed the ice in the main glacier slightly southward.”
“A photograph taken by researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (archived by the National Snow and Ice Data Center) shows an equally complicated Susitna Glacier in 1970, with dirt-free and dirt-encrusted surfaces forming stripes, curves, and U-turns.”
“Susitna flows over a seismically active area. In fact, a 7.9-magnitude quake struck the region in November 2002, along a previously unknown fault. Geologists surmised that earthquakes had created the steep cliffs and slopes in the glacier surface, but in fact most of the jumble is the result of surges in tributary glaciers.”
“Glacier surges—typically short-lived events where a glacier moves many times its normal rate—can occur when melt water accumulates at the base and lubricates the flow. This water may be supplied by meltwater lakes that accumulate on top of the glacier; some are visible in the lower left corner of this image. The underlying bedrock can also contribute to glacier surges, with soft, easily deformed rock leading to more frequent surges.”
NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using data provided courtesy of NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Michon Scott.
Instrument: Terra - ASTER 
Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

Susitna Glacier, Alaska by NASA Goddard Photo and Video

NASA image acquired August 27, 2009
Content below by NASA Goddard Photo and Video’s Flickr 

“Like rivers of liquid water, glaciers flow downhill, with tributaries joining to form larger rivers. But where water rushes, ice crawls. As a result, glaciers gather dust and dirt, and bear long-lasting evidence of past movements.”

“Alaska’s Susitna Glacier revealed some of its long, grinding journey when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite passed overhead on August 27, 2009. This satellite image combines infrared, red, and green wavelengths to form a false-color image. Vegetation is red and the glacier’s surface is marbled with dirt-free blue ice and dirt-coated brown ice. Infusions of relatively clean ice push in from tributaries in the north. The glacier surface appears especially complex near the center of the image, where a tributary has pushed the ice in the main glacier slightly southward.”

“A photograph taken by researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (archived by the National Snow and Ice Data Center) shows an equally complicated Susitna Glacier in 1970, with dirt-free and dirt-encrusted surfaces forming stripes, curves, and U-turns.”

“Susitna flows over a seismically active area. In fact, a 7.9-magnitude quake struck the region in November 2002, along a previously unknown fault. Geologists surmised that earthquakes had created the steep cliffs and slopes in the glacier surface, but in fact most of the jumble is the result of surges in tributary glaciers.”

“Glacier surges—typically short-lived events where a glacier moves many times its normal rate—can occur when melt water accumulates at the base and lubricates the flow. This water may be supplied by meltwater lakes that accumulate on top of the glacier; some are visible in the lower left corner of this image. The underlying bedrock can also contribute to glacier surges, with soft, easily deformed rock leading to more frequent surges.”

NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using data provided courtesy of NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Michon Scott.

Instrument: Terra - ASTER

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

(via scinerds)

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holymoleculesbatman:

The only elements that are liquid at room temperature are Bromine and Mercury. Only 4 others (Francium, Cesium, Gallium, and Rubidium) can exist in their liquid form between 25 and 40 degrees C.

(via shychemist)

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holymoleculesbatman:

This innocent molecule is called Phenacetin.
Phenacetin was introduced in 1887, and was used principally as an analgesic, and was one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. It is also known historically to be one of the first non-opioid analgesics without anti-inflammatory properties. 
Phenacetin is not used anymore, but.. why?
Our innocent friend can kill you. 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered the withdrawal of drugs containing Phenacetin in November 1983, owing to its carcinogenic and kidney-damaging properties. As a result some branded, previously Phenacetin-based preparations continued to be sold, but with the Phenacetin replaced by safer alternatives.

holymoleculesbatman:

This innocent molecule is called Phenacetin.

Phenacetin was introduced in 1887, and was used principally as an analgesic, and was one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. It is also known historically to be one of the first non-opioid analgesics without anti-inflammatory properties. 

Phenacetin is not used anymore, but.. why?

Our innocent friend can kill you.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered the withdrawal of drugs containing Phenacetin in November 1983, owing to its carcinogenic and kidney-damaging properties. As a result some branded, previously Phenacetin-based preparations continued to be sold, but with the Phenacetin replaced by safer alternatives.

(via shychemist)

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holymoleculesbatman:

Luminol is an organic compound with the molecular formula C8N3O2H7. In the presence of a catalyst called Potassium Ferricyanide, Luminol reacts with Hydrogen Peroxide to yield Nitrogen gas and 3-Aminophthalic Acid. This product molecule initially forms in an excited state and thus releases energy in the form of a ghostly blue light.

holymoleculesbatman:

Luminol is an organic compound with the molecular formula C8N3O2H7. In the presence of a catalyst called Potassium Ferricyanide, Luminol reacts with Hydrogen Peroxide to yield Nitrogen gas and 3-Aminophthalic Acid. This product molecule initially forms in an excited state and thus releases energy in the form of a ghostly blue light.

(via shychemist)

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