Posts tagged cassini
A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon
This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.
Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans
These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

A Different View of Saturn’s Hexagon

This is a true color view of Saturn’s north polar region, taken by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on June 26, 2013. You can see Saturn’s mysterious hexagon in the center.

Image Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / composite by Val Klavans

These images were taken on June 26, 2013 and received on Earth June 27, 2013. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 402,383 miles (647,573 kilometers) away, and the images were taken using the CL1, RED, BL1 and GRN filters.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via project-argus)

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Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

Prometheus creating Saturn ring streamers

What’s causing those strange dark streaks in the rings of Saturn? Prometheus. Specifically, an orbital dance involving Saturn’s moon Prometheus keeps creating unusual light and dark streamers in the F-Ring of Saturn. Now Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the thin F-ring, but ventures into its inner edge about every 15 hours. Prometheus’ gravity then pulls the closest ring particles toward the 100-km moon. The result is not only a stream of bright ring particles but also a dark ribbon where ring particles used to be. Since Prometheus orbits faster than the ring particles, the icy moon pulls out a new streamer every pass. Sometimes, several streamers or kinks are visible at once.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

(Source: distant-traveller)

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Angling Saturn
The Cassini spacecraft takes an angled view toward Saturn, showing the southern reaches of the planet with the rings on a dramatic diagonal. North on Saturn is up and rotated 16 degrees to the left. This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 14 degrees below the ringplane. The rings cast wide shadows on the planet’s southern hemisphere. The moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) appears as a small, bright speck in the lower left of the image.
Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Angling Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft takes an angled view toward Saturn, showing the southern reaches of the planet with the rings on a dramatic diagonal. North on Saturn is up and rotated 16 degrees to the left. This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 14 degrees below the ringplane. The rings cast wide shadows on the planet’s southern hemisphere. The moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) appears as a small, bright speck in the lower left of the image.

Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

(via distant-traveller)

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A body of mystery

Titan (or Saturn VI) is the largest moon of Saturn. It is the only natural satellite known to have a dense atmosphere, and the only object other than Earth for which clear evidence of stable bodies of surface liquid has been found.

1. Cassini image of Titan, behind Epimetheus and the rings; 2. Cassini image of Titan in front of the rings of Saturn

(Source: expose-the-light)

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2004: Launched in 1997, Cassini-Huygens eneters the orbit of Saturn in 2004 returning stunning images of the planet, its rings and its satellites. 

2004: Launched in 1997, Cassini-Huygens eneters the orbit of Saturn in 2004 returning stunning images of the planet, its rings and its satellites. 

(via fuckyeahspaceexploration)

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What are Saturn’s Rings Made Of?
Saturn is sometimes called the ”Jewel of the Solar System” because its ring system looks like a crown. The rings are well known, but often the question ”what are Saturn’s rings made of” arises. Those rings are made up of dust, rock, and ice accumulated from passing comets, meteorite impacts on Saturn’s moons, and the planet’s gravity pulling material from the moons. Some of the material in the ring system are as small as grains of sand, others are larger than tall buildings, while a few are up to a kilometer across. 
 Below is a list of the main rings and gaps between them along with distances from the center of the planet and their widths.
The D ring is closest to the planet. It is at a distance of 66,970 – 74,490 km and has a width of 7,500 km.
C ring is at a distance of 74,490 – 91,980 km and has a width of 17,500 km.
Columbo Gap is at a distance of 77,800 km and has a width of 100 km.
Maxwell Gap is at a distance of 87,500 km and has a width of 270 km.
Bond Gap is at a distance of 88,690 – 88,720 km and has a width of 30 km.
Dawes Gap is at a distance of 90,200 – 90,220 km and has a width 20 km.
B ring is at a distance of 91,980 – 117,580 km with a width: 25,500 km.
The Cassini Division sits at a distance of 117,500 – 122,050 km and has a width of 4,700 km.
Huygens gap starts at 117,680 km and has a width of 285 km – 440 km.
The Herschel Gap is at a distance of 118,183 – 118,285 km with a width of 102 km.
Russell Gap is at a distance of 118,597 – 118,630 km and has a width of 33 km.
Jeffreys Gap sits at a distance of 118,931 – 118,969 km with a width of 38 km.
Kuiper Gap ranges from 119,403 -119,406 km giving it a width of 3 km.
Leplace Gap is at a distance of 119,848 – 120,086 km and a width of 238 km.
Bessel Gap is at 120,305 – 120,318 km with a width of 10 km.
Barnard Gap is at a distance of 120,305 – 120,318 km giving it a width of 3 km.
A ring is at a distance of 122,050 – 136,770 km with a width of 14,600 km.
Encke Gap sits between 133,570-133,895 km for a width of 325 km.
Keeler Gap is at a distance of 136,530-136,565 km with a width of 35 km.
The Roche Division is at 136,770 – 139,380 km for a width 2600 km.
F ring is begins at 140,224 km, but debate remains as to whether it is 30 or 500 km in width.
G ring is between 166,000 – 174,000 km and has a width of 8,000 km.
Finally, we get to the E ring. It is between 180,000 – 480,000 km giving it a width of 300,000 km.

What are Saturn’s Rings Made Of?

Saturn is sometimes called the ”Jewel of the Solar System” because its ring system looks like a crown. The rings are well known, but often the question ”what are Saturn’s rings made of” arises. Those rings are made up of dust, rock, and ice accumulated from passing comets, meteorite impacts on Saturn’s moons, and the planet’s gravity pulling material from the moons. Some of the material in the ring system are as small as grains of sand, others are larger than tall buildings, while a few are up to a kilometer across. 

 Below is a list of the main rings and gaps between them along with distances from the center of the planet and their widths.

  • The D ring is closest to the planet. It is at a distance of 66,970 – 74,490 km and has a width of 7,500 km.
  • C ring is at a distance of 74,490 – 91,980 km and has a width of 17,500 km.
  • Columbo Gap is at a distance of 77,800 km and has a width of 100 km.
  • Maxwell Gap is at a distance of 87,500 km and has a width of 270 km.
  • Bond Gap is at a distance of 88,690 – 88,720 km and has a width of 30 km.
  • Dawes Gap is at a distance of 90,200 – 90,220 km and has a width 20 km.
  • B ring is at a distance of 91,980 – 117,580 km with a width: 25,500 km.
  • The Cassini Division sits at a distance of 117,500 – 122,050 km and has a width of 4,700 km.
  • Huygens gap starts at 117,680 km and has a width of 285 km – 440 km.
  • The Herschel Gap is at a distance of 118,183 – 118,285 km with a width of 102 km.
  • Russell Gap is at a distance of 118,597 – 118,630 km and has a width of 33 km.
  • Jeffreys Gap sits at a distance of 118,931 – 118,969 km with a width of 38 km.
  • Kuiper Gap ranges from 119,403 -119,406 km giving it a width of 3 km.
  • Leplace Gap is at a distance of 119,848 – 120,086 km and a width of 238 km.
  • Bessel Gap is at 120,305 – 120,318 km with a width of 10 km.
  • Barnard Gap is at a distance of 120,305 – 120,318 km giving it a width of 3 km.
  • A ring is at a distance of 122,050 – 136,770 km with a width of 14,600 km.
  • Encke Gap sits between 133,570-133,895 km for a width of 325 km.
  • Keeler Gap is at a distance of 136,530-136,565 km with a width of 35 km.
  • The Roche Division is at 136,770 – 139,380 km for a width 2600 km.
  • F ring is begins at 140,224 km, but debate remains as to whether it is 30 or 500 km in width.
  • G ring is between 166,000 – 174,000 km and has a width of 8,000 km.
  • Finally, we get to the E ring. It is between 180,000 – 480,000 km giving it a width of 300,000 km.

(via darylelockhart)

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expose-the-light:

Dione and Rhea
Dione and Rhea image taken by Cassini spacecraft on November 11, 2009
Image credits: NASA/JPL/Space Sciences Institute/Mike Malaska

expose-the-light:

Dione and Rhea

Dione and Rhea image taken by Cassini spacecraft on November 11, 2009

Image credits: NASA/JPL/Space Sciences Institute/Mike Malaska

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