Posts tagged atoms
Self-assembling particles to boost speed of computer chips.
Scientists have created new kinds of particles, 1/100th the diameter of a human hair, that spontaneously assemble themselves into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.
Particles engineered to spontaneously self-assemble like atoms forming molecules could give rise to new high-tech materials, leading to better optical displays and faster computer chips, researchers say.
The scientists say they could manipulate these bonds to create colloids of a specific color, size, chemical function or electrical conductivity. This, in turn, could lead to the production of new materials, such as photonic crystals to improve optical displays and boost the speed of computer chips.

Self-assembling particles to boost speed of computer chips.

Scientists have created new kinds of particles, 1/100th the diameter of a human hair, that spontaneously assemble themselves into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.

Particles engineered to spontaneously self-assemble like atoms forming molecules could give rise to new high-tech materials, leading to better optical displays and faster computer chips, researchers say.

The scientists say they could manipulate these bonds to create colloids of a specific color, size, chemical function or electrical conductivity. This, in turn, could lead to the production of new materials, such as photonic crystals to improve optical displays and boost the speed of computer chips.

(via contemplatingmadness)

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(Image: Nick Ballon) Nelly Ben Hayoun’s installation, Super K Sonic Booooum 2 opened at the Manchester Science Festival this weekend.  The exhibition brings visitors face to face with a replica of the Super Kamiokande neutrino detector in Japan. Visitors are taken down a 22 metre, water-filled tunnel lined with thousands of “detectors” - silver balloons. They are exposed to the loud booms and bright flashes of what could be Cherenkov radiation - representing the interactions between neutrinos and atoms of pure water in a real detector.The real Super K detector, located in Higashi-Mozumi, Gifu, Japan,  consists of a tank 1000m below ground containing 50,000 tons of pure water surrounded by over eleven thousand golden photomultiplier tubes which measure light emitted when neutrinos collide with water nuclei. Physicists monitor these reactions to gain insight into basic nature of matter, the universe, and the laws of physics.
(via Short Sharp Science: Manchester gets a neutrino detector made of balloons)

(Image: Nick Ballon)

Nelly Ben Hayoun’s installation, Super K Sonic Booooum 2 opened at the Manchester Science Festival this weekend.  The exhibition brings visitors face to face with a replica of the Super Kamiokande neutrino detector in Japan.

Visitors are taken down a 22 metre, water-filled tunnel lined with thousands of “detectors” - silver balloons. They are exposed to the loud booms and bright flashes of what could be Cherenkov radiation - representing the interactions between neutrinos and atoms of pure water in a real detector.

The real Super K detector, located in Higashi-Mozumi, Gifu, Japan,  consists of a tank 1000m below ground containing 50,000 tons of pure water surrounded by over eleven thousand golden photomultiplier tubes which measure light emitted when neutrinos collide with water nuclei. Physicists monitor these reactions to gain insight into basic nature of matter, the universe, and the laws of physics.

(via Short Sharp Science: Manchester gets a neutrino detector made of balloons)

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