Posts tagged astrophotography

expose-the-light:

Glowing Universe Overhead

(Source: shainblumphoto.com, via scinerds)

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(Source: segii, via songsofstarlight)

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Milky Way Shows 84 Million Stars in 9 Billion Pixels

Side Note: The two images shown above are mere crop outs from ESA’s recent hit: The 9 Billion Pixel Image of 84 Million Stars. These two focus on the bright center of the image for the purpose of highlighting what a peak at 84,000,000 stars looks like.

Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory in Chile have released a breathtaking new photograph showing the central area of our Milky Way galaxy. The photograph shows a whopping 84 million stars in an image measuring 108500×81500, which contains nearly 9 billion pixels.

It’s actually a composite of thousands of individual photographs shot with the observatory’s VISTA survey telescope, the same camera that captured the amazing 55-hour exposure. Three different infrared filters were used to capture the different details present in the final image.

The VISTA’s camera is sensitive to infrared light, which allows its vision to pierce through much of the space dust that blocks the view of ordinary optical telescope/camera systems.

source

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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I look up — many people feel small because they’re small and the Universe is big — but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity.

That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant, you want to feel like a participant in the goings on of activities and events around you.

That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive…


- Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson [ x ]

(Source: kavaeric, via songsofstarlight)

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Showoff! by Fragile Oasis on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Our home planet, making a spectacle of itself. Photographed by a human living and working on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Showoff! by Fragile Oasis on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Our home planet, making a spectacle of itself. Photographed by a human living and working on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

(Source: spacettf, via distant-traveller)

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Filaments in the Cygnus Loop
Subtle and delicate in appearance, these are filaments of shocked interstellar gas — part of the expanding blast wave from a violent stellar explosion. Recorded in November 1997 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, the picture is a closeup of a supernova remnant known as the Cygnus Loop. The nearly edge-on view shows a small portion of the immense shock front moving toward the top of the frame at about 170 kilometers per second while glowing in light emitted by atoms of excited Hydrogen gas. Situated at over 1,440 light-years away, the Cygnus Loop is thought to have been expanding for 5 - 10 thousand years.
Image credit: William P. Blair and Ravi Sankrit (Johns Hopkins University), NASA

Filaments in the Cygnus Loop

Subtle and delicate in appearance, these are filaments of shocked interstellar gas — part of the expanding blast wave from a violent stellar explosion. Recorded in November 1997 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, the picture is a closeup of a supernova remnant known as the Cygnus Loop. The nearly edge-on view shows a small portion of the immense shock front moving toward the top of the frame at about 170 kilometers per second while glowing in light emitted by atoms of excited Hydrogen gas. Situated at over 1,440 light-years away, the Cygnus Loop is thought to have been expanding for 5 - 10 thousand years.

Image credit: William P. Blair and Ravi Sankrit (Johns Hopkins University), NASA

(Source: distant-traveller)

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Stargazing by Maurice Toet

Stargazing by Maurice Toet

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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spaceplasma:

Phantom Galaxy M74
An image of the region of sky around M74, the “Phantom Galaxy”, from the Digitized Sky Survey 2. The field-of-view is approximately 2.8 x 2.8 degrees.
Credit: NASA/ ESA/ Digitized Sky Survey 2/ Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble)

spaceplasma:

Phantom Galaxy M74

An image of the region of sky around M74, the “Phantom Galaxy”, from the Digitized Sky Survey 2. The field-of-view is approximately 2.8 x 2.8 degrees.

Credit: NASA/ ESA/ Digitized Sky Survey 2/ Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble)

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