Posts tagged astronomy

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ucresearch:

A Powerful Eye into Deep Space

The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) —which has been spearheaded by UC and the California Institute of Technology since 2003— will be built and run by a consortium of universities and scientific organizations from around the world. 

Special adaptive optics will correct for the blurring of Earth’s atmosphere, enabling the TMT to study the universe as clearly as if the telescope were in space (In fact, it has 12 times the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope).

Once finished, the new telescope will allow astronomers to see faint objects clearer than ever before:

It will be able to focus on and identify extremely distant structures that currently appear as blurry smudges in the Hubble Deep Field. As yet, no one knows what these objects are.

This new resolution will provide insights into the both dark matter and dark energy. And it will widen the search for planets orbiting stars outside our solar system. For the first time, we will be able to routinely image direct light from these exoplanets, garnering information on their atmospheric chemistry and dynamics.

The new TMT will also be able to see further back in time than any previous telescope, all the way back to the formation of the first stars and galaxies that followed the universe’s “Dark Ages.”

Most certainly one of the most major astronomical observatories in production I’m extremely amped about…more on the Thirty Meter Telescope HERE!

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teded:

Astronomer Johannes Kepler proved that planetary orbits are elliptical and that the Sun is not the center of the orbit.
From the TED-Ed Lesson Reasons for the seasons - Rebecca Kaplan
Animation by Marc Christoforidis

teded:

Astronomer Johannes Kepler proved that planetary orbits are elliptical and that the Sun is not the center of the orbit.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Reasons for the seasons - Rebecca Kaplan

Animation by Marc Christoforidis

(via spaceplasma)

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sagansense:


Space Shuttle Discovery

via spaceexp
#WhatIsNASAFor? continuing the human tradition of exploration.

sagansense:

Space Shuttle Discovery

via spaceexp

#WhatIsNASAFor? continuing the human tradition of exploration.

(via distant-traveller)

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expose-the-light:

Glowing Universe Overhead

(Source: shainblumphoto.com, via scinerds)

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(Source: yimmyayo, via sagansense)

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kenobi-wan-obi:

Candle in the Dark


  Saturn’s rings cut across an eerie scene that is ruled by Titan’s luminous crescent and globe-encircling haze, broken by the small moon Enceladus, whose icy jets are dimly visible at its south pole.
  
  The scattered light around planet-sized Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) makes the moon’s solid surface visible in silhouette. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across) enjoys far clearer skies than its giant sibling moon.
  
  This view shows the unlit side of Saturn’s rings.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Candle in the Dark

Saturn’s rings cut across an eerie scene that is ruled by Titan’s luminous crescent and globe-encircling haze, broken by the small moon Enceladus, whose icy jets are dimly visible at its south pole.

The scattered light around planet-sized Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) makes the moon’s solid surface visible in silhouette. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across) enjoys far clearer skies than its giant sibling moon.

This view shows the unlit side of Saturn’s rings.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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sagansense:

High cliffs surrounding Echus Chasma on Mars

What created this great cliff on Mars? Did giant waterfalls once plummet through its grooves? With a four-kilometer drop, this high cliff surrounding Echus Chasma, near an impressive impact crater, was carved by either water or lava. A leading hypothesis is that Echus Chasma, at 100-kilometers long and 10-kilometers wide, was once one of the largest water sources on Mars. If true, water once held in Echus Chasma likely ran over the Martian surface to carve the impressive Kasei Valles, which extends over 3,000 kilometers to the north. Even if initially carved by water, lava appears to have later flowed in the valley, leaving an extraordinarily smooth floor. Echus Chasma lies north of tremendous Valles Marineris, the largest canyon in the Solar System. The above image was taken by the robotic Mars Express spacecraft currently orbiting Mars.

Image credit: G. Neukum (FU Berlin) et al., Mars Express, DLR, ESA

via distant-traveller:

sagansense:

High cliffs surrounding Echus Chasma on Mars

What created this great cliff on Mars? Did giant waterfalls once plummet through its grooves? With a four-kilometer drop, this high cliff surrounding Echus Chasma, near an impressive impact crater, was carved by either water or lava. A leading hypothesis is that Echus Chasma, at 100-kilometers long and 10-kilometers wide, was once one of the largest water sources on Mars. If true, water once held in Echus Chasma likely ran over the Martian surface to carve the impressive Kasei Valles, which extends over 3,000 kilometers to the north. Even if initially carved by water, lava appears to have later flowed in the valley, leaving an extraordinarily smooth floor. Echus Chasma lies north of tremendous Valles Marineris, the largest canyon in the Solar System. The above image was taken by the robotic Mars Express spacecraft currently orbiting Mars.

Image credit: G. Neukum (FU Berlin) et al., Mars Express, DLR, ESA

via distant-traveller:

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The Road of Rest by Shingo Takei

Northern stars shine above Japanese Alps (the northern range). The photographer has made this image in a moonlit night from Mount Norikura in Gifu Prefecture, Central Japan.

The Road of Rest by Shingo Takei

Northern stars shine above Japanese Alps (the northern range). The photographer has made this image in a moonlit night from Mount Norikura in Gifu Prefecture, Central Japan.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

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